Showing 1–16 of 60 results

  • The Hare With Amber Eyes : A Hidden Inheritance

    R250

    When he later inherited the ‘netsuke’, they unlocked a story far larger and more dramatic than he could ever have imagined. From a burgeoning empire in Odessa to fin de siecle Paris, from occupied Vienna to Tokyo, Edmund de Waal traces the netsuke’s journey through generations of his remarkable family against the backdrop of a tumultuous century.

  • Languages of Truth : Essays 2003-2020

    R450

    An incisive and inspiring collection of non-fiction essays, criticism and speeches that takes readers on a thrilling journey through the evolution of language and culture Gathering pieces written between 2003 and 2020, including several never previously in print, Languages of Truth chronicles a period of momentous cultural shifts.

  • A Beginner’s Guide to Terrarium Gardening

    R270

    This book includes 52 projects that teach you how to create a wide variety of terrariums-from open-air containers, like bowls, to jars and hanging decorations. No matter how you choose to display them, terrariums are a whimsical, easy and inexpensive addition to your home.

  • The Overstory

    R230

    A wondrous, exhilarating novel about nine strangers brought together by an unfolding natural catastrophe. The perfect literary escape. An artist inherits a hundred years of photographic portraits, all of the same doomed American chestnut.

  • If Cats Disappeared From The World

    R200

    A beautifully moving tale of loss and reaching out to the ones we love, of one man’s journey to discover what really matters in modern life. Our narrator’s days are numbered. Estranged from his family, living alone with only his cat Cabbage for company, he was unprepared for the doctor’s diagnosis that he has only months to live.

  • Drawing as Therapy: Know Yourself Through Art

    R400

    At its core, art therapy embraces the paradigm that creating images cuts to the chase when it comes to expressing feelings. The point is not to draw well. But to draw with authenticity. This is specifically a book for people who can’t draw.

  • Shop Cats of Hong Kong

    R290

    Against a background of Hong Kong’s bustling dried goods trade, dusty shelves groaning with traditional products, the beloved cats either stand out as shop mascots or magically melt away behind boxes and jars. Meanwhile, their innermost thoughts, delivered deadpan, are revealed through Ian Row’s intuitive haiku and stories.

  • Old Dogs

    R230

    Following the success of A Dog a Day (Pavilion, 2017), Sally Muir returns with a collection of new, but crucially old, faces. Several years ago Sally Muir began a Facebook project, posting dog art daily, which became the best-selling book A Dog A Day. Through the project she was introduced to endless people and their dogs, and the distinct personalities and complex emotions that owners attribute to them.

  • Fallen Idols : Twelve Statues That Made History

    R450

    Statues are one of the most visible – and controversial – forms of historical storytelling. The stories we tell about history are vital to how we, as societies, understand our past and create our future. So whose stories do we tell? Who or what defines us? What if we don’t all agree? How is history made, and why?  FALLEN IDOLS looks at twelve statues in modern history. It looks at why they were put up; the stories they were supposed to tell; why those stories were challenged; and how they came down. History is not erased when statues are pulled down. If anything, it is made.

  • The Bookshop Cat

    R180

    With a bit of help from his family and friends, the Bookshop Cat comes up with a brilliant plan to bring the Children’s Bookshop back to life!

  • Feline Philosophy : Cats and the Meaning of Life

    R450

    Feline Philosophy draws on centuries of philosophy, from Montaigne to Schopenhauer, to explore the complex and intimate links that have defined how we react to and behave with this most unlikely ‘pet’.

  • A Month in Siena

    R225

    Matar was nineteen years old when his father was kidnapped. In the year following he found himself turning to art, particularly the great paintings of the Sienese School.

    They became a refuge and a way to think about the world outside the urgencies of the present. A quarter of a century later, having found no trace of his father, Matar finally visits the birthplace of those paintings. A Month in Siena is the encounter between the writer and the city.

  • Hamilton and Me: An Actor’s Journal

    R380

    When Lin-Manuel Miranda’s groundbreaking musical Hamilton opened in London’s West End in December 2017, it was as huge a hit as it had been in its original production off- and on Broadway. Lauded by critics and audiences alike, the show would go on to win a record-equalling seven Olivier Awards – including Best Actor in a Musical for Giles Terera, for his portrayal of Aaron Burr. For Terera, though, his journey as Burr had begun more than a year earlier, with his first audition in New York, and continuing through extensive research and preparation, intense rehearsals, previews and finally opening night itself.

     

  • P.S. I Love You More Than Tuna

    R290

    P.S. I Love You More Than Tuna gives friends and loved ones an opportunity to step forward and offer tangible comfort during the grieving period, when many people feel isolated and misunderstood after a beloved pet dies. Heart felt but not saccharine, this first-of-its-kind book offers readers solace and inspiration using New Yorker-style illustrations paired with simple, evocative language.

  • Mackintosh

    R270

    In this introductory book, we take in Mackintosh’s practice across art, architecture, and design to explore his particular combination of the statuesque and sensual and its vital influence on modernist expression across Europe. Featured projects include his complete scheme for the Willow Tea Rooms and the Mackintosh Building at the Glasgow School of Art, widely considered Mackintosh’s masterwork.

  • Hopper

    R270

    The scenes are marked by vivid color juxtapositions and stark, theatrical lighting, as well as by harshly contoured figures, who appear at once part of, and alien to, their surroundings. The ambiance throughout his repertoire is of an eerie disquiet, alienation, loneliness and psychological tension, although his rural or coastal scenes can offer a counterpoint of tranquility or optimism. This book presents key works from Hopper’s oeuvre to introduce a key player not only in American art history but also in the American psyche.