Showing 1–16 of 132 results

  • #ZuptasMustFall – And Other Rants (Paperback)

    R230

    Who are these Guptas who are so powerful, they’re distributing cabinet posts like matrons handing out condoms at a brothel? Who do Americans think they are, accusing Trevor Noah of ‘stealing’ a joke from one of their comedians? Is Sizakele MaKhumalo Zuma’s spaza shop a National Key Point? In #ZuptasMustFall, and other rants, Fred Khumalo runs riot, contemplating the pressing issues that continue to confound, infuriate and exasperate the nation – or to sink it into further controversy. Covering a wide range of topics, including politics, history, current events and celebrity gossip, this compilation of recent and new writings contains Khumalo’s trademark blend of humour and shrewd analysis, as well as his treatment of everyday issues from a uniquely South African perspective. This is an entertaining collection of thoughts from one of the country’s most seasoned journalists, offering many questions, and tongue-in-cheek answers, on who we are as a nation, where we are going, and how we compare to the rest of the world.

  • A Long Way Home-Migrant Worker Worlds

    R400

    A Long Way Home captures the humanity, agency and creative modes of self-expression of the millions of workers who helped to build and shape modern South Africa.

    The book spans a three-hundred-year history beginning with the exportation of slave labour from Mozambique in the eighteenth century and ending with the strikes and tensions on the platinum belt in recent years. It shows not only the age-old mobility of African migrants across the continent but also, with the growing demand for labour in the mining industry, the importation of Chinese indentured migrant workers.

    Contributions include 18 essays and over 90 artworks and photographs that traverse homesteads, chiefdoms and mining hostels, taking readers into the materiality of migrant life and its customs and traditions, including the rituals practiced by migrants in an effort to preserve connections to “home” and create a sense of “belonging”. The essays and visual materials provide multiple perspectives on the lived experience of migrant labourers and celebrate their extraordinary journeys.

    A Long Way Home was conceived during the planning of an art exhibition entitled ‘Ngezinyawo: Migrant Journeys’ at Wits Art Museum. The interdisciplinary nature of the contributions and the extraordinary collection of images selected to complement and expand on the text make this a unique collection.

  • A Simple Man

    R260

    Ronnie Kasrils’s insights into Jacob Zuma, both shocking and revelatory, are vividly illuminated through this story-from their shared history in the underground to Kasrils’s time as minister of intelligence and his views on South Africa now. This fast-paced, thriller-style memoir outlines the tumultuous years that saw Mbeki’s overthrow and replacement by Zuma, Nkandlagate, the growing militarization of the police and the Marikana Massacre, the outrageous appointment of flunkies to high office, the “”state capture”” report and his relationship with the Guptas. We relive the Schabir Shaik corruption trial, Kasrils’s relationship with Fezeka Kuzwayo (Khwezi), Zuma’s rape trial accuser, the email and spy tapes saga, conspiracy, and betrayal. While Kasrils explains the enigmatic contradictions of Jacob Zuma, he also explains that corruption and the abuse of power did not begin with him. His story points to the compromised negotiations of the 1990s, which he refers to as a “”Faustian Pact.”” This is a story told from the inside, exploring the many machinations of power and how one man’s struggle for the truth can have such an impact on the political outcomes of a nation.

  • Africa’s Peacemakers – Nobel Peace Laureates of African Descent

    R450

    As Africa and its diaspora commemorate fifty years of post-independence Pan-Africanism, this unique volume provides profound insight into the thirteen prominent individuals of African descent who have won the Nobel Peace Prize since 1950. From the first American president of African descent, Barack Obama, whose career was inspired by the civil rights and anti-apartheid struggles…

  • Age of Iron

    R270

    Age of Iron is a novel by South African and Nobel Prize winning author J.M. Coetzee, published in 1990. Set in Apartheid era Cape Town, the novel is told in an epistolary style through the letters of Mrs Curren, a white elderly Classics professor who is slowly dying of cancer, to her daughter, who has left South Africa for America.

  • Art+Revolution: The life and death of Thami Mnyele

    R250
  • Being Chris Hani’s Daughter

    R250

    When Chris Hani was assassinated in his driveway in April 1993, he left a shocked and grieving South Africa, teetering on the precipice of civil war. But to 12-year-old Lindiwe Hani, it was the love of her life, her daddy, who had been brutally ripped from her world. While the nation continued to revere her father’s legacy, for Lindiwe, being Chris Hani’s daughter became an increasingly heavy burden to bear, propelling her into a downward spiral of cocaine and alcohol addiction in a desperate attempt to avoid the pain of his brutal parting.

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    Breyten Breytenbach : A Monologue in Two Voices

    R150

    In this beautiful book on the work of Breyten Breytenbach, Saayman argues that writing and painting form two manifestations of one and the same creative force in Breytenbach’s ouevre.

     

  • Child Of This Soil – My Life as a Freedom Fighter

    R250

    LETLAPA MPHAHLELE, Apla Commander, is that rarest of creatures: a military man with a sensitive, seeking soul. In Child of this Soil, Mphahlele tells his story, giving us an insider’s view into the heart of the armed struggle. After a childhood marked by a questing, rebellious nature, the young Letlapa flees South Africa in search of his destiny. His exile will not end for many years, as he embarks on the turbulent, nomadic life of a guerrilla: swept from one end of Africa to the other, migrating from refugee camp to prison cell to High Command.

  • Conscience of the Human Spirit: The Life of Nelson Mandela: Tributes by Quilt Artists from South Africa and the United States

    R300

    In 2013 the world mourned the passing of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, one of its most revered champions of human rights. Mandela provided a moral compass for how we treat each other, how we lead our own lives, and how we need to continue to strive for a just, fair, nonracial, and democratic society. Artists around the world have long made quilts in tribute to Mandela and in support of and advocacy for the principles to which he was devoted. But it is for South Africans and African Americans that making quilts in tribute to Mandela has had special meaning. Conscience of the Human Spirit, which accompanies an exhibition by the same name, features quilts made after Mandela’s death?diverse and powerful pieces reflect the ways in which this remarkable man touched individual lives, changed a nation, and served as the conscience of the human spirit for individuals around the world.

    This book is a collaborative project of the Michigan State University Museum, Women of Color Quilters Network, and South African quilt artists.

  • Epainette Nomaka Mbeki: A Humble Journey on her Footprints

    R300

    Epainette Mbeki (née Moerane) (born February 16, 1916) is the mother of former South African president Thabo Mbeki and widow of political activist Govan Mbeki. A Humble Journey On Her Footprints is the brainchild of writer and photographer Ndabula. She explains: “When I met Umama I was truly humbled. I felt there was a need…

  • Fallen Idols : Twelve Statues That Made History

    R450

    Statues are one of the most visible – and controversial – forms of historical storytelling. The stories we tell about history are vital to how we, as societies, understand our past and create our future. So whose stories do we tell? Who or what defines us? What if we don’t all agree? How is history made, and why?  FALLEN IDOLS looks at twelve statues in modern history. It looks at why they were put up; the stories they were supposed to tell; why those stories were challenged; and how they came down. History is not erased when statues are pulled down. If anything, it is made.

  • Future of Capitalism

    R220

    In this bold work of intellectual trespass, Paul Collier, a distinguished economist, ventures onto the terrain of ethics to explain what’s gone wrong with capitalism, and how to fix it. To heal the divide between metropolitan elites and the left-behind, he argues, we need to rediscover an ethic of belonging, patriotism, and reciprocity. Offering inventive solutions to our current impasse, Collier shows how economics at its best is inseparable from moral and political philosophy’ – Michael Sandel, author of What Money Can’t Buy and Justice

  • Keeping a Sharp Eye

    R140

    For a century cartoonists have been commenting on South Africa’s international relations. Indeed, they were doing so long before the academic discipline of International Relations was born. Before think-tanks and international relations experts made their voices heard, a more subversive, and certainly more spicy, variety of understanding and criticism of international relations was at work….

  • Letters to Camondo

    R340

    ‘Letters to Camondo immerses you in another age… de Waal creates a dazzling picture of what it means to live graciously.  Subtle and thoughtful and nuanced and quiet. It is demanding but rewarding.

  • Losing The Plot – Crime, Reality And Fiction In Postapartheid Writing

    R350

    In Losing The Plot, well-known scholar and writer Leon de Kock offers a lively and wide-ranging analysis of postapartheid South African writing which, he contends, has morphed into a far more flexible and multifaceted entity than its predecessor. If postapartheid literature’s founding moment was the ‘transition’ to democracy, writing over the ensuing years has viewed the Mandelan project with increasing doubt. Instead, authors from all quarters are seen to be reporting, in different ways and from divergent points of view, on what is perceived to be a pathological public sphere in which the plot- the mapping and making of social betterment – appears to have been lost.