Showing 1–16 of 28 results

  • Tate Introductions: Warhol

    R160

    Warhol’s work reflected and commented on contemporary themes in American society: consumerism; celebrity; mass production; disaster and death. To capture these ideas he used a wide range of iconic images: Coca Cola; Marilyn Monroe; Elvis Presley; the electric chair; the crashed car; the race riot; and the atomic bomb. His openness to subject matter was matched by a willingness to explore all media, resulting in his innovative approach to painting, photography, drawing and printmaking, and his influential activity as an experimental filmmaker.

  • Pop Art

    R120

    Peaking in the 1960s, Pop Art began as a revolt against mainstream approaches to art and culture and evolved into a wholesale interrogation of modern society, consumer culture, the role of the artist, and of what constituted an artwork.

  • Surrealism

    R120

    With Salvador Dalí as its figurehead, the great ship of Surrealism traversed the turbulent seas of the early 20th century with sails billowing with dreams and desires. Inspired by the psychoanalytical practice of Sigmund Freud, the Surrealists championed the unconscious as the domain of truth, uninhibited by the standards or expectations of society.

  • Impressionism

    R120

    In this TASCHEN Basic Art introduction to Impressionism, we explore the artists, subjects, and techniques that first brought the easel out of the studio and shifted artistic attention from history, religion, or portraiture to the evanescent ebb and flow of modern life.

  • Futurism

    R120

    With motion and machines as its most treasured tropes, Futurism was founded in 1909 by Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, along with painters Giacomo Balla, Umberto Boccioni, Carlo Carrà, and Gino Severini. With affiliate painters, sculptors, designers, architects, and writers, the group sought to subsume the dusty establishment into a new age of sleek, strong, purified modernity.

  • Cubism

    R120

    Pioneered by Picasso and Braque, Cubism has been described as the first avant-garde art movement of the 20th century. With inspiration from African and Native American art and sculpture, its practitioners deconstructed European conventions of viewpoint, form, perspective to create flattened, fragmented, and revolutionary images.

  • Impressionist Art

    R250

    It was a dappled and daubed harbor scene that gave Impressionism its name. When Impression, Sunrise by Claude Monet was exhibited in April 1874, critics seized upon the work’s title and its loose stylistic rendering of light and motion upon water to deride this new, impressionistic tendency in art.

  • Abstract Art

    R120

    Abstraction shook Western art to its core. In the early part of the 20th century, it refuted the reign of clear, indisputable forms and confronted audiences instead with vivid visual poems devoid of conventional representational imagery and characterized by allegories of emotion and sensation. This radical artistic adventure established new artistic means, as much as…

  • Romanticism

    R120

    Around 1800, philosophers, writers, and artists revolted against rationalism, spreading a new “romantic” vision—one that believed in the goodness of humanity, the divine spirit of nature, and that saw the artist as an individual creator. This comprehensive introduction gathers an essay situating the genre across different regions, crisp reproductions, and detailed interpretations of 31 crucial pieces. For more information…

  • Symbolism

    R120

    Whether fear, anguish, or unrequited desire, Symbolist painters believed that art should reflect an emotion or idea rather than a realistic representation of the natural world. This book brings together some of the most important images from their mysterious, spiritual, and seductive visual language. For more information click here

  • Abstract Expressionism

    R120

    From vast, splattered canvases to quiet pools of color, enter the world of Abstract Expressionism, the movement which put feelings into paint and turned New York into the global center for contemporary art. This book features works from 20 key artists, including Jackson Pollock, Philip Guston, Robert Motherwell, Mark Rothko, and Willem de Kooning.

  • Abstract Expressionism

    R80

    The most important art movement since the Second World War, Abstract Expressionism revolutionized the way Americans viewed art and culture alike. Drawing on a vast array of scholarly research, David Anfam examines the politically radical spirit of a nucleus of artists who transgressed the traditional forms of American art and faced the tensions of a modernizing society.

  • The Surrealism Reader: An Anthology of Ideas

    R550

    This book details the surrealist engagement with major themes in the intellectual history of the twentieth century. It draws together essays from the whole history of surrealism to illustrate the tenacity and consistency with which the surrealists treated themes of psychological reality and the construction of identity, cultural communication, freedom and poetry.

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    Farewell to Surrealism: The DYN Circle in Mexico

    R235

    Transformed by the mysterious pre-Columbian artifacts and monuments that suffused the Mexican landscape…

  • Movements in Modern Art: Abstract Art

    R80

    In a new approach to the subject, Mel Gooding rejects the widely accepted notion that the story of abstraction can be traced as a succession of stylistic trends each set within its own art historical context.

  • Movements in Modern Art: Abstract Expressionism

    R80

    Although influenced to some extent by Surrealism and European abstract painting, Abstract Expressionism was hailed by critics as the first truly American avant-garde movement. It took post-war America by storm and its impact was swiftly felt