Showing 1–16 of 46 results

  • WAITING for the SIBYL

    R1,150

    The text in this book is essentially the libretto of the chamber opera WAITING for the SIBYL, which was made for the Teatro dell’Opera di Roma and first performed there in September 2019. Music for the opera was composed by Nhlanhla Mahlangu and Kyle Shepherd.

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    The Head & the Load

    R1,750 R990

    For over thirty years, William Kentridge has been combining fine arts, performance, theatre, and opera to create dreamlike, political, and humanist works. His installations , films, and drawings often deal with the political situation in South Africa, apartheid, and the consequences of colonialism. This book gives an in-depth examination of his performance piece The Head & The Load, which explores the role of Africa during World War I. Throughout the war, more than one million Africans carried provisions and military equipment in hazardous conditions for British, French, and German troops at minimal or no pay.

     

  • Fire Walker

    R500

    Far more than being about a single artwork, this book participates in the myriad conversations and debates on the meaning of public art. The essays prise open critical questions about public space in Johannesburg; Oliver Barstow’s interviews with the various collaborators on the sculpture reveal the complexities and challenges of creating such a massive work in so short a time; and the images by John Hodgkiss of the making of the sculpture, alongside two photo essays suggest the metaphorical power of Fire Walker as well as the fragile hold of street vendors over their small share of city space.

  • Animated Painting – San Diego Museum of Art

    R350

    Illustrated with approximately 235 color images and packaged with a DVD of selected videos, Animated Painting brings together some of the most compelling recent contemporary art to combine traditional conceptions of painting and drawing with the techniques and time-based elements of animation.

  • William Kentridge: Black box/Chambre noire

    R2,000

    In the course of designing his recent production of Mozart’s “The Magic Flute, ” artist and animated filmmaker William Kentridge created a mechanized theater maquette. When he saw the miniature stage’s potential as sculpture, projection site, and installation, he began to imagine “Black Box, ” the freestanding structure whose development and installation are documented here. A movement-filled, visually charged piece, it is peopled with two-dimensional mechanical figures, completed with scenic elements and lit by flickering video. A digital projector displays animated films created from Kentridge’s charcoal drawings and sculptures. Kentridge considers his title term in three senses: a “black box” theater, a “chambre noire” as it relates to photography, and a “black box” flight data recorder, as used in airline disasters. The clandestine fourth reference may be to his ongoing exploration of German history and its convergence with South African history through Namibia, a former German colony that came under South African control prior to gaining its independence. “Black Box” evokes all that, and the joyful mechanics of pre-cinematic visual spectacles, magic lanterns, the camera obscura and the zoetrope. A unique and richly layered meditation on the act of seeing, on vision and experience, and on the nature of knowledge itself.

  • Why Should I Hesitate – Putting Drawings to Work

    R1,350

    Why Should I Hesitate: Putting Drawings To Work – at Zeitz MOCAA – will offer a wide survey of Kentridge’s work, including early works, as well as newer pieces on view for the first time in South Africa. It will cover over 40 years of artistic production (1976 – 2019) in drawing, stop-frame animation, video, prints, sculpture, tapestry, and large-scale installation.

    The title references Kentridge’s primary practice of drawing and how this core activity informs and enables his studio practice. It also references the impact of individual action on history and the reverse – how history shapes the contemporary and the future – and works as a commentary on various shifting hegemonies of power politics, economies, language and the authority to narrate history.

  • William Kentridge: Right Into Her Arms

    R400

    Accompanying Exhibition Catalogue

  • William Kentridge: That Which We Do Not Remember

    R1,500

    William Kentridge emerged as an artist during the apartheid regime in South Africa. Grounded in the violent absurdity of that period in his country’s history, his artworks draw connections between art, ideology, history and memory. Curated by the artist, this exhibition encourages viewers to trace visual and thematic links between diverse aspects of his practice, from his engagement with opera to his interest in early cinema, from his inimitable animated drawings to sculpture and works on paper.

  • William Kentridge: Triumphs and Laments (SIGNED)

    Triumphs and Laments is not only a celebration of William Kentridge’s (born 1955) monumental frieze drawn along the banks of the Tiber River in Rome and the performance which inaugurated it, but a gorgeously produced guide to one of his most memorable and ambitious projects to date.

  • Out of stock

    William Kentridge – 2nd Hand Reading

    R1,300

    2nd Hand Reading began life as a film constructed from a succession of drawings made in 2013 on the pages of old books—a second-hand reading in which books are translated into a filming of books.

  • Footnotes For The Panther – William Kentridge

    R480

    In June of 2010, William Kentridge asked Denis Hirson to join him in a public conversation at the opening of Cinq Thèmes, the artist’s retrospective exhibition at the Jeu du Paume in Paris. So fruitful was this event that the two decided to have further conversations, public and private, whenever the time and the occasion seemed right. Nine engagements followed, allowing them to explore at great length the many issues and themes arising from Kentridge’s work.

  • William Kentridge – Being Led by the Nose

    R695

    This book is more than just a simple record of The Nose. The opera serves as a springboard into a bracing conversation about how Kentridge’s methods serve his unique mode of expression as a narrative and political artist.

  • Out of stock

    William Kentridge (October Files)

    This October Files volume brings together critical essays and interviews that explore Kentridge’s work and shed light on the unique working processes behind his drawings, prints, stop-animation films, and theater works. he texts include an interview by the artist Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, curator of the first major retrospective of Kentridge’s work; an essay by Andreas Huyssen on the role of shadow-play in Kentridge’s film series 9 Drawing for Projection; and investigations of Kentridge’s work for opera and theater by Maria Gough, Joseph Leo Koerner, and Margaret Koster Koerner.

  • William Kentridge – Thick Time

    R550

    William Kentridge: Thick Time undertakes an overview of the artist’s recent works, focusing on a sequence of five key pieces dating from 2003 to 2015. These encompass three immersive audiovisual installations, including The Refusal of Time, selected works on paper, and ideas for theatre and opera design.

  • The Soho Chronicles: William Kentridge

    R1,500

    In The Soho Chronicles, Kentridge’s brother, Matthew, who has witnessed the evolution of William’s technique, themes, and ideas, shares a never before seen perspective on both William and Soho that sheds new light on the creator and his alter ego.

  • William Kentridge – Art and Australia – What will Come (Has Already Come)

    R400

    Quarterly Journal Volume 36 Number 2 – Summer 1998.In its various incarnations, Art & Australia has enjoyed a long and rich history as Australia’s premier art journal. The magazine continues to evolve, focusing now on the latest developments in Australian and international contemporary art, and on encouraging emerging artists. The quarterly publication approaches art in innovative…