Showing 1–16 of 21 results

  • A lasting Impression: The Robert Hodgins Print Archive

    R350

    A Lasting Impression: The Robert Hodgins print Archive is a 284 page lavishly illustrated full-colour catalogue that accompanied the exhibition at Wits Art Museum in 2013. In 2007, Robert Hodgins donated his archive of almost 400 prints to the museum. The catalogue documents the entire collection and includes incisive and illuminating essays by leading thinkers…

  • A million years ago in the 90’s

    R390
  • Booknesses: Artist’s Books from the Jack Ginsberg Collection

    R500

    The exhibition Booknesses: Artists’ Books from the Jack Ginsberg Collection formed part of the larger Booknesses enterprise. The exhibition, consisting of 229 international and 29 local artists’ books and an extensive catalogue, was one of the largest and most ambitious exhibitions of its kind globally. Curated by David Paton, with the assistance of Rosalind Cleaver and Jack Ginsberg, the…

  • Collage by Women

    R660

    Collage by Women presents 50 international women artists working in the field of collage today through a rigorous selection of their works. Curated by the Spanish collage artist Rebeka Elizegi, this women artists book gives space to voices from all backgrounds, origins, and artistic expressions, and shows the wide variety of perspectives that are shaping the panorama of collage today, bringing to light a parallel effervescence of female artistic initiatives around the world.

  • David Goldblatt: The Last Interview

    R1020

    Accompanied by a selection of some of David Goldblatt’s (1930–2018) lesser-known photographs, this distilled dialogue is drawn directly from the recordings of a roving conversation with the photographer conducted three months before his death in June 2018. Goldblatt was born in Randfontein?a mining town on the Witwatersrand gold reef?in 1930, the grandson of Lithuanian-Jewish migrants…

  • Ernest Cole House of Bondage

    R1100

    Cole, a Black South African man, photographed the underbelly of apartheid in the 1950s and ’60s, often at great personal risk. He methodically captured the myriad forms of violence embedded in everyday life for the Black majority under the apartheid system—picturing its miners, its police, its hospitals, its schools. In 1966, Cole fled South Africa and smuggled out his negatives; House of Bondage was published the following year with his writings and first-person account. This edition retains the powerful story of the original while adding new perspectives on Cole’s life and the legacy of House of Bondage. It also features an added chapter—compiled and titled “Black Ingenuity” by Cole—of never-before-seen photographs of Black creative expression and cultural activity taking place under apartheid. Made available again nearly fifty-five years later, House of Bondage remains a visually powerful and politically incisive document of the apartheid era.

  • Future of Capitalism

    R220

    In this bold work of intellectual trespass, Paul Collier, a distinguished economist, ventures onto the terrain of ethics to explain what’s gone wrong with capitalism, and how to fix it. To heal the divide between metropolitan elites and the left-behind, he argues, we need to rediscover an ethic of belonging, patriotism, and reciprocity. Offering inventive solutions to our current impasse, Collier shows how economics at its best is inseparable from moral and political philosophy’ – Michael Sandel, author of What Money Can’t Buy and Justice

  • Great Women Painters

    R1250

    Great Women Painters is a groundbreaking book that reveals a richer and more varied telling of the story of painting. Featuring more than 300 artists from around the world, it includes both well-known women painters from history and today’s most exciting rising stars.

    Covering nearly 500 years of skill and innovation, this survey continues Phaidon’s celebrated The Art Book series and reveals and champions a more diverse history of art, showcasing recently discovered and newly appreciated work and artists throughout its more than 300 pages and images.

  • Infinity Net: The Autobiography of Yayoi Kusama

    R500

    ‘I am deeply terrified by the obsessions crawling over my body, whether they come from within me or from outside. I fluctuate between feelings of reality and unreality. I, myself, delight in my obsessions.’ Yayoi Kusama is one of the most significant contemporary artists at work today. This engaging autobiography tells the story of her life and extraordinary career in her own words, revealing her as a fascinating figure and maverick artist who channels her obsessive neuroses into an art that transcends cultural barriers.

  • Jackson Hlungwani

    R1500

    Hlungwani’s body of sculpture articulates his spiritual journey, his insights, and his world in three-dimensional form aiding him in his life’s mission as orator, teacher, healer, and visionary. The sculptures are evidence not only of a remarkable sustained artistic endeavour, but are also, by nature, sculptures that teach. Hlungwani created specific works for the two altars on the hilltop site that he called ‘New Jerusalem.’ These sculptures – as well as many others – expressed his immanent relationship with God, Christ and the Archangels Gabriel and Michael. His numinous world was then directed to his community in his teachings, and beyond, as he freely shared his vision of a new world order.

  • Jeremy Wafer (Signed)

    R1180

    South African sculptor Jeremy Wafer was born in 1953 in Durban and is Professor of Sculpture in the School of Arts of the University of the Witwatersrand. He was awarded the Standard Bank National Drawing Prize in 1987 and the Sasol Wax Art Award in 2006.  

  • Light, TATE

    R600

    A remarkable exploration of the use of light in art from the last 200 years Light has been an enduring subject in art. In every conceivable media, artists have exploited the contrasts between light and dark, opposed cool and warm colors, drawn on science, and attempted to capture the transient effects of light and its…

  • Looking into the mad eye of history without blinking

    R520
  • Making Modernism

    R625

    Käthe Kollwitz (1867–1945), Paula Modersohn-Becker (1876–1907), Gabriele Münter (1877–1962) and Marianne Werefkin (1860–1938) are among the exceptional artists associated with the emergence of Expressionism in Germany in the early decades of the 20th century. Each challenged prevailing ideals of feminine identity at a time of great societal change. As women, they were expected to marry and raise a family; some chose to, some did not. As ambitious artists, they wanted to work.
    As they rose to these challenges, their art further undermined conventions. Their portraits of children symbolize joy, hope and innocence but also melancholy, tension, curiosity, the passing of time and unfulfilled desire. Their radical depictions of the nude wrest the female body away from the male gaze toward a newfound role, expressive of powerful maternity and female subjectivity.

  • Notes on Falling

    R290

    Notes on Falling is about the hope that art will challenge perceptions and orthodoxy so that the world can be reinvented through new forms. It is also about trying to reconcile the large pictures of history with the small snapshots of our individual lives.

  • Positions : Contemporary artists in South Africa

    R400

    Ranging from resistance to education, contemporary artists are increasingly raising opposition to economic pressure, radical social change and rapidly changing identities. How does the local contemporary art scene respond to the worldwide dynamics of globalisation? Which social, political and cultural positions do individual artists adopt? This volume presents views of some of South Africa’s most prominent artists, writers, choreographers, photographers and musicians. Produced in direct dialogue with journalists and cultural scientists from the respective art scenes, developments within today’s cultural flashpoints are illuminated in interviews, portraits and essays.

    Throughout, the focus is on the artists’ individual perspectives, not theoretical or historical concepts, with their specific approaches and different forms of expression they give insight into the pressing issues of South African society, showing how political art is positioned in the post-apartheid era.