Showing all 5 results

  • History in Contemporary Art and Culture

    R600

    Written primarily for a broad range of fine arts students, this book encourages readers to reconsider their studies and art practices in light of a historical perspective, enhanced by creative contributions from artists, imaginative philosophers, and influential cultural commentators.

  • Misère: The Visual Representation of Misery in the 19th Century

    An incisive new piece of scholarship from renowned art historian Linda Nochlin tackling the concept of “misere,” or social misery, as it was reflected in the work of writers, artists, and philosophers in the nineteenth century.

  • Strange Cargo: Essays on Art

    R1750

    This collection of 40 essays by Ashraf Jamal can be regarded as a companion to his previous book, In the World: Essays on Contemporary South African Art. Together, they form a single venture to celebrate and entrench the rich complexity of South African artists in a global imaginary.

  • The Whole Picture

    R250

    From the stolen Wakandan art in Black Panther, to Emmanuel Macron’s recent commitment to art restitution, and Beyoncé and Jay Z’s provocative music video filmed in the Louvre, the question of decolonising our relationship with the art around us is quickly gaining traction. People are waking up to the seedy history of the world’s art collections, and are starting to ask difficult questions about what the future of museums should look like.

    In The Whole Picture, art historian and Uncomfortable Art Tour guide Alice Procter provides a manual for deconstructing everything you thought you knew about art, and fills in the blanks with the stories that have been left out of the art history canon for centuries.

  • Woman in the Picture

    R330

    In this impassioned book, art historian Catherine McCormack asks us to look again at what these images have told us to value, opening up our most loved images – from those of Titian and Botticelli to Picasso and the Pre-Raphaelites. She also shows us how women artists – from Berthe Morisot to Beyonce, Judy Chicago to Kara Walker – have offered us new ways of thinking about women’s identity, sexuality, race and power.