Showing all 12 results

  • Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty

    R950

    Published to coincide with an exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art organized by The Costume Institute, this stunning book includes a preface by Andrew Bolton; an introduction by Susannah Frankel; an interview by Tim Blanks with Sarah Burton, creative director of the house of Alexander McQueen; illuminating quotes from the designer himself; provocative and captivating new photography by renowned photographer Sølve Sundsbø; and a lenticular cover by Gary James McQueen.

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    Alice, Curiouser and Curiouser

    R875

    Williams, Alice: Curiouser and Curiouser goes on to explore how Lewis Carroll’s celebrated Alice books have fuelled creative minds for over 150 Years. This unique publication takes us on a journey whose scope ranges from art, literature, theatre and film through science and technology to fashion and politics, encouraging us to ask whether we should all try to be more like Alice.

  • Bansky: Completed

    R750

    Banksy is the world’s most famous living artist, yet no one knows who he is. For more than twenty years, his wryly political and darkly humorous spray paintings have appeared mysteriously on urban walls around the globe, generating headlines and controversy. Art critics disdain him, but the public (and the art market) love him. With this generously illustrated book, artist and critic Carol Diehl is the first author to probe the depths of the Banksy mystery. Through her exploration of his paintings, installations, writings, and Academy Award-nominated film, Exit through the Gift Shop, Diehl proves unequivocally that there’s more to Banksy than the painting on the wall.

  • Chagall

    R250

    For Marc Chagall (1887-1985), painting was an intricate tapestry of dreams, tales, and traditions. His instantly recognizable visual language carved out a unique early 20th-century niche, often identified as one of the earliest expressions of psychic experience.

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    Expanding the Universe: The Hubble Space Telescope

    R750

    With investigations into everything from black holes to exoplanets, the Hubble Telescope has changed not only the face of astronomy but also our very sense of being in the universe. On the 30th anniversary of its launch into low-earth orbit, this updated edition of Expanding Universe presents 30 brand new images, unveiling more hidden gems from the Hubble’s archives.

    Ultra-high resolution and taken with almost no background light, these pictures have answered some of the most compelling questions of time and space while also revealing new mysteries, like the strange “dark energy” that sees the universe expanding at an ever-accelerating rate.

  • Jo Van Gogh-Bogner

    R500

    Little known but no less influential, Jo van Gogh-Bonger was sister-in-law of Vincent van Gogh, wife of his brother, Theo. When the brothers died soon after each other, she took charge of Van Gogh’s artistic legacy and devoted the rest of her life to disseminating his work.

    Despite being widowed with a young son, Jo successfully navigated the male-dominated world of the art market-publishing Van Gogh’s letters, organizing exhibitions in the Netherlands and throughout the world, and making strategic sales to private individuals and influential dealers-ultimately establishing Van Gogh’s reputation as one of the finest artists of his generation. In doing so, she fundamentally changed how we view the relationship between the artist and his work.

  • L’Arc de Triomphe, Wrapped by Christo and Jeanne-Claude

    R625

    Like most of Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s work, L’Arc de Triomphe, Wrapped is temporary and runs for 16 days from Saturday, September 18 to Sunday, October 3, 2021. Carried out in close collaboration with the Centre des Monuments Nationaux, the historic structure is wrapped in recyclable polypropylene fabric in silvery blue and recyclable red rope. The project is the posthumous realisation of a long-held dream for Christo and Jeanne-Claude, who first drew up plans to wrap the Arc de Triomphe in 1961 while renting a small room near the monument.

  • Surviving Autocracy

    R250

    As the 2020 US Presidential race takes shape, Surviving Autocracy provides an indispensable overview of the calamitous trajectory of the past few years. Drawing on her Soviet childhood and two decades covering the resurgence of totalitarianism in Russia, acclaimed New Yorker journalist and prize-winning author Masha Gessen links together seemingly disparate elements of Trump’s regime to offer a roadmap for understanding Trump’s approach, policies and ultimate aims. Highlighting an inventory of ravages to liberal democracy, including the corrosion of the media, the justice system and cultural norms, she posits that America is in the throws of an autocratic attempt.

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    Terence: The Man Who Invented Design

    R625

    Terence: The Man Who Invented Design is the most definitive, intimate and revelatory biography of this design legend, by two of his closest collaborators, Roger Mavity and Stephen Bayley. Frank, amusing, indiscreet, sharp, rude, respectful and knowing, it tells Terence’s story as it evolved, from before Habitat’s humble chicken brick to Bibendum’s sophisticated poulet de Bresse, via personal successes and corporate calamities, culminating in that peculiar temple to the religion he invented: The Design Museum. It celebrates Terence’s genius and immeasurable impact on British life – and ensures his rightful status as national treasure. Terence: The Man Who Invented Design is the most candid, up-close insight into the man and myth.

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    The Philosophy of Tattoos

    R250

    Tattooing is an ancient practice with profound religious and cultural significance. While western tattooing centres on three main traditions – Polynesian, Japanese and Euro-American — it has been recorded more or less everywhere.
    Beginning with the birth of the tattoo, John Miller explores this unique expression of personal, cultural and national identity, the tension between tattoo’s status as a fashion item and its roots in subculture, and the relevance of magic — a crucial part of tattooing’s origins — in contemporary society.

  • Basquiat

    R375

    Jean-Michel Basquiat was only twenty-seven when he died in 1988, his meteoric and often controversial career having lasted for just eight years. Despite his early death, Basquiat’s powerful ouvre has ensured his continuing reputation as one of modern art’s most distinctive voices. Borrowing from graffiti and street imagery, cartoons, mythology and religious symbolism, Basquiat’s drawings…

  • Frida Kahlo: I Paint my Reality

    R180

    This book traces the extraordinary life of an artist whose unforgettable imagery combined cruelty and wit, honesty and insolence, pain and empowerment.