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    Zanele Muholi – Hail the Dark Lioness

    Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness is the long-awaited monograph from one of the most powerful visual activists of our time. The book features over ninety of Muholi’s evocative self-portraits, each image drafted from material props in Muholi’s immediate environment. A powerfully arresting collection of work, Muholi’s radical statements of identity, race, and resistance are a direct response to contemporary and historical racisms.

    With more than twenty written contributions from curators, poets, and authors, alongside luxurious tritone reproductions of Muholi’s images, Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness is as much a manifesto of resistance as it is an autobiographical, artistic statement.

  • Lie on Your Wounds: The prison correspondence of Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe

    R420

    This book collates nearly 300 prison letters to and from Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe, inspirational political leader and first President of the Pan-Africanist Congress. These letters are testimony to the desolate conditions of his imprisonment and to his unbending commitment to the cause of African liberation.

  • Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe: New Reflections

    R270

    A collection of thought-provoking and moving essays on Robert Sobukwe, commissioned and edited by his biographer and friend Benjamin Pogrund. Sobukwe was a lecturer, lawyer, founding member and first president of the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC), and Robben Island prisoner.

  • Fire Walker

    R500

    Far more than being about a single artwork, this book participates in the myriad conversations and debates on the meaning of public art. The essays prise open critical questions about public space in Johannesburg; Oliver Barstow’s interviews with the various collaborators on the sculpture reveal the complexities and challenges of creating such a massive work in so short a time; and the images by John Hodgkiss of the making of the sculpture, alongside two photo essays suggest the metaphorical power of Fire Walker as well as the fragile hold of street vendors over their small share of city space.

  • Nelson Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom (Picture Book Edition)

    R200

    Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela is the amazing story of a true hero of our times; his famous biography has been specially adapted for children in a beautiful illustrated picture book format. Discover how a little boy whose father called him “troublemaker” grew up to fight apartheid, become South Africa’s first black president and campaign for freedom and justice throughout the world.

  • Quite Footsteps

    R140

    Quite Footsteps explores moral themes relating to political and social change in South Africa. An obscene clamour that the poet sees as eviscerating our country’s humanity becomes the catalyst for an excoriating attack on a time that “renders everything as matters of abuse”, and a passionate demand that we find in ourselves – for ourselves, and in honour of the spirits of the dead – the capacity for the humane. This major work by one of South Africa’s poets will trouble every conscience, even as it revives our faltering hope for a healed nation.

  • Letotoba

    R140

    Letotoba is a collection of 33 new poems that focuses on different themes namely; spiritual, relationships (love), politics, youth (June 16), inspiration and motivation.

  • The Stellenbosch Mafia: Inside the Billionaire’s Club

    R280

    About 50km outside of Cape Town lies the beautiful town of Stellenbosch, nestled against vineyards and blue mountains that stretch to the sky. Here reside some of South Africa’s wealthiest individuals: all male, all Afrikaans – and all stinking rich. Johann Rupert, Jannie Mouton, Markus Jooste and Christo Weise, to name a few.

  • Leon Trotsky – A Revolutionary?s Life

    R300

    Here, Trotsky emerges as a brilliant and brilliantly flawed man. Rubenstein offers us a Trotsky who is mentally acute and impatient with others, one of the finest students of contemporary politics who refused to engage in the nitty-gritty of party organization in the 1920s, when Stalin was maneuvering, inexorably, toward Trotsky’s own political oblivion.

  • The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money & Power

    Deemed “the best history of oil ever written” by Business Week and with more than 300,000 copies in print, Daniel Yergin’s Pulitzer Prize–winning account of the global pursuit of oil, money, and power has been extensively updated to address the current energy crisis.

  • The Black Consciousness Reader

    R280

    Black Consciousness is turning up the heat against oppressive rule, exploitation and racism in South Africa and around the world, as political and student movements, academics and campaigners reconfigure a global socio-economic revolution.

  • Picasso: Peace and Freedom

    R500

    “Picasso: Peace and Freedom” is the first in-depth examination of Picasso as a politically and socially engaged artist, from the 1940s, when he defiantly remained in Paris during the Nazi occupation, throughout the subsequent Cold War period. Picasso was a member of, and a huge financial donor to, the Communist Party from 1944 until his death in 1973.

  • I Write What I Like – 40th anniversary edition

    R200

    I Write What I Like features the writing of the famous activist and Black Consciousness leader, Steve Biko. Before his untimely death in detention at age 30, he was instrumental in uniting Black Africans in the struggle against the apartheid government in South Africa.

  • Killing Karoline

    R100

    Killing Karoline follows the journey of the baby girl (categorised as ‘white’ under South Africa’s race classification system) who is raised in a leafy, middle-class corner of the South of England by a white couple. It takes the reader through the formative years, a difficult adolescence and into adulthood, as Sara-Jayne (Karoline) seeks to discover who she is and where she came from.

  • The Art Of Life In South Africa

    R530

    From 1952 to 1981, South Africa’s apartheid government ran an art school for the training of African art teachers at Indaleni, in what is today KwaZulu-Natal. The Art of Life in South Africa is the story of the students, teachers, art, and politics that circulated through a small school, housed in a remote former mission station. It is the story of a community that made its way through the travails of white supremacist South Africa and demonstrates how the art they made together became the art of their lives.

  • The Art of Life in South Africa

    R530
    Daniel Magaziner is associate professor of history at Yale University. He is the author of The Law and the Prophets: Black Consciousness in South Africa, 1968–1977.

    ‘A richly suggestive and moving contribution to South African intellectual history.’ Achille Mbembe, author of Critique of Black Reason

    ‘This book is as important for students of global modernism as it is for scholars of South African art, history, and politics.’ Tamar Garb, author of Figures and Fictions: Contemporary South African Photography