Wyndham Lewis

R125

Wyndham Lewis (1882-1957), the self-styled ‘Enemy’, was the most important British writer-artist of the twentieth-century. In this, the first introduction to explore Lewis’s work both as painter and a writer, Richard Humphreys examines his hugely varied output, and explains his ideas about art, life and politics.

Description

Wyndham Lewis (1882-1957), the self-styled ‘Enemy’, was the most important British writer-artist of the twentieth-century. In this, the first introduction to explore Lewis’s work both as painter and a writer, Richard Humphreys examines his hugely varied output, and explains his ideas about art, life and politics.

Leader of the Vorticist movement before the First World War, Lewis was a pioneer of modernism in Britain. As well as creating a powerful body of paintings and drawings, and editing magazines such as Blast and The Tyro, Lewis wrote short stories, essays, novels and books on philosophy, literature, politics and cultural criticism. Dogged by controversy as a satirist and for his political views between the wars, Lewis lived in North America during the Second World War before ending his career, blind, in London.

Fully illustrated throughout, Wyndham Lewis examines the legacy of this controversial but inspiring figure, the scale of whose contribution to modernism is at last being recognised.

Additional information

ISBN

9781854375247