Showing 1–16 of 24 results

  • A Little History of Art

    R510

    A thrilling journey through 100,000 years of art, from the first artworks ever made to art’s central role in culture today “This lively volume is ideal for the precocious high-schooler, the lazy collegian . . .

    and any adult who wishes for greater mastery of the subject. . .

  • Carroll Dunham Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné, 1984-2006

    R570

    Widely known for his vibrant paintings that employ a variety of styles–including abstraction, figuration, pop, and cartoon–Carroll Dunham (b. 1949) is also one of the most prolific printmakers of his generation. An integral part of his artistic process, Dunham’s prints combine the spontaneity and drama of his paintings with the careful premeditation demanded of the medium. His imagery–which shares the wickedly cartoony semi-abstractions of his paintings–is transformed, refined, and often intensified in his graphic work. “Carroll Dunham Prints” documents the artist’s entire print archive–which includes nearly 300 lithographs, etchings, drypoints, linocuts, wood engravings, screenprints, digital prints, and most recently, monotypes–the majority of which have never before been published. The authors examine the significance of printmaking to Dunham’s overall oeuvre, his innate sensitivity toward the systematic materials and procedures of printmaking, his inventive approach to this process, and the evolution of his imagery. It also features an insightful essay by Dunham that discusses his journey as a printmaker and his discoveries of the medium.

  • David Goldblatt: No Ulterior Motive

    R1540

    A panorama of the career of South African photographer David Goldblatt, elucidating his artistic commitments, networks, and influence

  • Hidden in the Shadow of the Master: The Model-Wives of Cézanne, Monet & Rodin

    R350

    In this remarkable book of discovery, art historian Ruth Butler coaxes three shadowy women out of obscurity and introduces them for the first time as individuals. Through unprecedented research, Butler has been able to create portraits of Hortense Fiquet, Camille Doncieux, and Rose Beuret—the models, and later the wives, respectively, of Cézanne, Monet, and Rodin, three of the most famous French artists of their generation

  • Michelangelo

    Central to all of Michelangelo’s artistic endeavors were his drawings, in which his creative ideas originated, evolved, and were perfected. This handsome book takes a fascinating tour of the artist’s drawings by looking at highlights––ranging from unfinished sketches to delicate, refined studies––all of which are located in the exceptional collection of the British Museum. Included are studies of some of Michelangelo’s most famous works such as the Sistine Chapel ceiling and the Last Judgement.

  • Ruth Asawa Through Line

    R1650

    A groundbreaking examination of how the act of drawing was a vital component of Ruth Asawa’s multifaceted art

  • A Living Man from Africa

    R295

    Born into a Xhosa royal family around 1792 in South Africa, Jan Tzatzoe was destined to live in an era of profound change—one that witnessed the arrival and entrenchment of European colonialism. As a missionary, chief, and cultural intermediary on the eastern Cape frontier and in Cape Town and a traveler in Great Britain, Tzatzoe…

  • Andy Warhol

    R180

    In a work of great wisdom and insight, art critic and philosopher Arthur Danto delivers a compact, masterful tour of Andy Warhol’s personal, artistic, and philosophical transformations. Danto traces the evolution of the pop artist, including his early reception, relationships with artists such as Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg, and the Factory phenomenon.

  • Bernard Berenson: A Life in the Picture Trade (Jewish Lives)

    R275

    When Gilded Age millionaires wanted to buy Italian Renaissance paintings, the expert whose opinion they sought was Bernard Berenson, with his vast erudition, incredible eye, and uncanny skill at attributing paintings.

  • Burden Of Representation: Essays on Photographies and Histories

    R300

    Photographs are used as documents, records and evidence every day in courtrooms and hospitals, on passports and driving licences. But how did photographs come to be established and accepted, what sort of agencies and institutions have the power to enforce this status and, more generally, what concept of photographic representation is entailed and what are its consequences?

  • Elizabeth and Hazel :Two Women of Little Rock

    R260

    The names Elizabeth Eckford and Hazel Bryan Massery may not be well known, but the image of them from September 1957 surely is: a black high school girl, dressed in white, walking stoically in front of Little Rock Central High School, and a white girl standing directly behind her, face twisted in hate, screaming racial epithets.

  • Faulkner and Love: The Women Who Shaped His Art, A Biography

    R450

    This book is about the making of the writer William Faulkner. It is the first to inquire into the three most important women in his life—his black and white mothers, Caroline Barr and Maud Falkner, and the childhood friend who became his wife, Estelle Oldham

  • Frankly, My Dear

    R165

    How and why has the saga of Scarlett O’Hara kept such a tenacious hold on our national imagination for almost three-quarters of a century? In the first book ever to deal simultaneously with Margaret Mitchell’s beloved novel and David Selznick’s spectacular film version of Gone with the Wind, film critic Molly Haskell seeks the answers.

  • Grand Scale: Monumental Prints in the Age of Dürer and Titian

    R600

    “Grand Scale” brings to light rare surviving examples of mural-size prints – a Renaissance art form nearly lost from historical record.

  • Holocaust Odysseys

    R210

    This book describes the ever-escalating dangers to which Jewish refugees and recent immigrants were subjected in France and Italy as the Holocaust marched forward. Susan Zuccotti uncovers a grueling yet complex history of suffering and resilience through historical documents and personal testimonies from members of nine central and eastern European Jewish families, displaced to France in the opening years of the Second World War. The chronicle of their lives reveals clearly that these Jewish families experienced persecution of far greater intensity than citizen Jews or long-time resident immigrants.

  • Out of stock

    Moses Mendelssohn: Sage of Modernity (Jewish Lives)

    R300

    The German Socrates, Moses Mendelssohn (died 1786) was the most influential Jewish thinker of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. A Berlin celebrity and a major figure in the Enlightenment, revered by Immanuel Kant, Mendelssohn suffered the indignities common to Jews of his time while formulating the philosophical foundations of a modern Judaism suited for a new age