Showing 1–16 of 80 results

  • Zanele Muholi – Hail the Dark Lioness

    Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness is the long-awaited monograph from one of the most powerful visual activists of our time. The book features over ninety of Muholi’s evocative self-portraits, each image drafted from material props in Muholi’s immediate environment. A powerfully arresting collection of work, Muholi’s radical statements of identity, race, and resistance are a direct response to contemporary and historical racisms.

    With more than twenty written contributions from curators, poets, and authors, alongside luxurious tritone reproductions of Muholi’s images, Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness is as much a manifesto of resistance as it is an autobiographical, artistic statement.

  • Lie on Your Wounds: The prison correspondence of Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe

    R420

    This book collates nearly 300 prison letters to and from Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe, inspirational political leader and first President of the Pan-Africanist Congress. These letters are testimony to the desolate conditions of his imprisonment and to his unbending commitment to the cause of African liberation.

  • Indaba, My Children: African Tribal History, Legends, Customs and Religious Beliefs

    R280

    First published in 1964, Indaba, My Children is an internationally acclaimed collection of African folk tales that chart the story of African tribal life since the time of the Phoenicians. It is these stories that have shaped Africa as we know it.

  • Fire Walker

    R500

    Far more than being about a single artwork, this book participates in the myriad conversations and debates on the meaning of public art. The essays prise open critical questions about public space in Johannesburg; Oliver Barstow’s interviews with the various collaborators on the sculpture reveal the complexities and challenges of creating such a massive work in so short a time; and the images by John Hodgkiss of the making of the sculpture, alongside two photo essays suggest the metaphorical power of Fire Walker as well as the fragile hold of street vendors over their small share of city space.

  • Tate Introductions: Andy Warhol

    R180

    A central figure in pop art, Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was one of the most significant and influential artists of the later twentieth century. In the 1960s he began to explore the growing interplay between mass culture and the visual arts, and his constant experimentation with new processes for the dissemination of art played a pivotal role in redefining access to culture and art as we know it today.

  • Letotoba

    R140

    Letotoba is a collection of 33 new poems that focuses on different themes namely; spiritual, relationships (love), politics, youth (June 16), inspiration and motivation.

  • The most popular art exhibition ever!

    R270

    There are some artists for whom ‘popular’ is a bit of a dirty word. Grayson Perry is not one of them. He thinks art shouldn’t be an exclusive club for people who ‘get’ it, but for everyone – that’s why his new show is called The Most Popular Art Exhibition Ever!

  • Cyril’s Choices: Lessons from 25 Years of Freedom in South Africa

    R290

    President Cyril Ramaphosa, Nelson Mandela’s preferred successor, faces new problems and new choices since he won his own electoral mandate in May 2019. In the next five years, South Africa will be changed radically by the climate crisis, the Fourth Industrial Revolution, economic stagnation and political unrest among some of its southern African neighbours, and the rising African influence of Russia and China while the West is distracted by the insurgent populism of US President Donald Trump and Brexit.

  • Primitivism and modern art

    A fascination with the primitive lies at the heart of some of the most influential developments in Western art produced between 1890 and 1950 – a time that witnessed both the heroic period of modern art and the decline of Western colonial power. This work is an overview of this period.

  • The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an a Temporal World

    R600

    The Forever Now presents paintings by seventeen artists whose singular approaches are characteristic of our cultural moment in refusing to allow us to define, or even meter our time by them. This tendency was first identified by the science-fiction writer William Gibson, who used the term “atemporality” to describe a cultural product that doesn’t represent—through its style, its content, or its medium—the time from which it comes. Atemporality, or timelessness, manifests itself in painting as both a profligate mixing of past styles and genres and also a radical paring down of visual language to the most archetypal forms.

  • Émigrés: The Transformation of Art Publishing in Britain

    R700

    “Some of the most interesting insights are about cultural changes. . . Fascinating details. The most original parts of the book are the chapters on the unsung heroes of publishing: typographers, designers, printers and illustrators. Nyburg creates a picture of a whole visual culture. These extraordinarily cultured individuals didn’t just affect art books. They made British culture, once notoriously parochial and wordy, more cosmopolitan and more visual.” – Jewish Renaissance

  • Ditema: Some Decorated Sotho Buildings

    The Sotho tradition of decorating the outside of their houses with painted and engraved patterns and pebbles set into plaster is fast disappearing. Less well-known than the Ndebele mural art, it is a particularly beautiful form of vernacular architectural decoration. Some examples of this traditional art form are featured here, as well as a number of examples of later Sotho mural art

  • George Stubbs

    R175

    In this study, Martin Myrone presents a less familiar account of the artist. From his earliest anatomical studies through to his depictions of exotic animals and experiments with the industrialist Josiah Wedgwood, Stubbs is shown to have been dynamically engaged with the science, technology and popular culture of his day. He emerges from this new account as an artist more experimental and challenging than is conventionally thought.

  • Pop Art

    R100

    This study follows the development of Pop, from its roots in the irreverence of Dada and Surrealism, to its rise in popularity as an art form that celebrated the glamour and hedonism of the newly commercialized Western world, while acknowledging its superficiality and transience.

  • Costume and Fashion A Concise History

    R180

    A classic study of the history of fashion brought right up to date

  • The Theatre: A Concise History

    R180

    The essential guide the history of theatre, updated and extended to cover the key themes and shows of early twenty-first century drama