Showing 33–48 of 385 results

  • Venice with Turner

    R625

    Experience the magic and wonder of the majestic floating city through the eyes of one of the world’s great painters.

  • A Bigger Splash: Painting after Performance

    R270

    This exhibition will take a new look at the dynamic relationship between performance and painting since 1950. Contrasting key paintings by Jackson Pollock and David Hockney, the exhibition considers two different approaches to the idea of the canvas as an arena in which to act: one gestural, the other one theatrical. The paintings of the…

  • A Book of Fifty Drawings by Aubrey Beardsley

    R250

    During his lifetime, Beardsley’s subversive illustrations became synonymous with decadence: he delighted in the erotic, shocking audiences with his bizarre sense of humour and fascination with the grotesque. His work was deemed too scandalous by many publishers of the period, but found a suitably unseemly home with the notorious Leonard Charles Smithers (1861–1907). Shortly before his death, with his health in steep decline Beardsley converted to Roman Catholicism and asked Smithers to ‘destory all copies of Lysistrata and bad drawings’. Smithers dutifully ignored his wishes and went on to sell many reproductions and forgeries of his work.

  • A Painter’s Progress: A Portrait of Lucian Freud

    R550

    For nearly twenty years David Dawson was Lucian Freud’s assistant, companion, and model. Freud moved in rarefied, powerful circles and was tenacious about protecting his privacy. He also carefully avoided distraction. With few exceptions, he wanted only those he knew well, like the late Bruce Bernard, to photograph him. David Dawson, however, was in a unique position, and as Freud became comfortable in the presence of Dawson’s camera, photographing became part of the daily ritual of the studio. These photographs reveal in a most intimate way the subjects and the stages of paintings in progress. Few artists, if any, have had their lives and their work recorded over such a length of time.

  • A Picasso Portfolio

    R500

    Printmaking was fundamental to Pablo Picasso’s artistic vision. Over his long career, he made well over 2,000 printed images, focusing on the intaglio techniques of etching, engraving, drypoint and aquatint, as well as on lithography and linoleum cut. This publication, published to accompany an exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, explores Picasso’s creative process in printmaking starting in the early years of the twentieth century with his Blue and Rose periods, and extending up to the last years of his life.

  • A Robert Gober Lexicon

    R440

  • Abraham Cruzvillegas

    R400

    Abraham Cruzvillegas (b.1968), one of the key figures to have emerged in Mexico among a new wave of conceptual artists, is best known for his sculptural works made from found objects and materials. Created in close collaboration with the artist, the book will feature a fully illustrated survey of Cruzvillegas’s life and work and an in-depth interview with curator Mark Godfrey. Exploring in fascinating detail the artistic processes involved in creating this monumental new work, it will include stunning photographs of the dramatic new installation to be revealed in the Turbine Hall in October 2015.

  • Albers and Moholy-Nagy: From the Bauhaus to the New World

    R500

    This extensively illustrated survey casts new light on the lives and work of two of Modernism’s great pioneers. Josef Albers (1888-1976) and Laszlo Moholy-Nagy (1895-1947) were key figures at the Bauhaus in Germany, and following the rise of National Socialism and their

  • Albert Adams – Journey On A Tightrope

    R320

    The first comprehensive retrospective exhibition of works by Albert Adams ran at Iziko Museum. Albert Adams was born in Johannesburg in 1930 but at the age of four came to Cape Town with his mother and sister. He attended Livingstone High School and studied at Hewat College in Cape Town. Unable to study at the Michaelis School of Art, University of Cape Town, because of the apartheid policies, he applied for, and was awarded a scholarship to study at the Slade School of Art in London where he studied from 1953 to 1956. He enrolled for a brief course of study at the Munich Academy of Arts and later in 1957 attended master classes under the internationally renowned artist, Oskar Kokoschka.

    He returned to Cape Town where he exhibited widely but in 1960 decided to leave South Africa for good and settled in London. He taught for a while at schools in the East End of London and in 1979 was appointed to the staff of the City University, London where he lectured in art history for 18 years. Towards the end of 2006 Adams was diagnosed with lung cancer and after a brief stay in hospital passed away on 31 December 2006.

    An instinctive expressionist Adams’ subject matter is evidence of a deep social commitment and he can rightly be seen as an heir to Francisco Goya (1740 – 1828). Often his subject matter is inspired by international events but he always  returned to South Africa for inspiration, depicting, amongst others, the homeless people of Cape Town, the darker side of the Cape Minstrels and in a more allusive way the ‘baggage’ or legacy of apartheid.

    Although Adams exhibited extensively and, on more than one occasion was chosen to represent South Africa on international exhibitions, his long period of absence from South Africa has resulted in the undue neglect of a major talent.

    This retrospective exhibition will result in Albert Adams being recognized and established as a major South African artist.

  • Alberto Giacommetti

    Alberto Giacometti is one of the few artists of the last century whose work is almost more recognisable than his name. This exhibition catalogue provides a comprehensive overview of Giacometti’s career, from his first professional works of art through to his surrealist compositions, focuses on the art, the people and the events that influenced him, and on the original and experimental way in which he worked.

  • Alexander Calder: Performing Sculpture

    R750

    American sculptor Alexander Calder was a radical figure who pioneered kinetic sculpture, bringing movement to static objects. Calder travelled to Paris in the 1920s, having originally trained as an engineer, and by 1931 he had invented the mobile, a term coined by Duchamp to describe Calder’s sculptures which moved of their own accord.

  • Out of stock

    Alexis Preller: Africa, the Sun and Shadows

    R350

    In the course of his forty-year career, major South African artist Alexis Preller achieved national recognition and critical acclaim. Loyal admirers flocked to every exhibition by the master colourist. Yet, there were also those who were disturbed by his frequently cryptic themes and who denounced his distinctly independent and often enigmatic work.

  • Alfred Wallis

    R175

    AIfred Wallis spent most of his life in the Cornish ports of Newlyn, Penzance and St Ives, and went to sea as a young man: His main occupation was as a dealer in marine supplies and he was in his seventies before he took up painting `for company’. He sold his works for a few pence, and died in the poorhouse.

  • Alice Maher: Profile

    R150

    Published as part of Gandon Editions’ PROFILES series on Irish artists.

  • Alighiero Boetti:Game Plan

    R500

    Published to accompany the first large-scale retrospective of Alighiero Boetti’s work outside Italy in over a decade, this volume presents the most comprehensive overview of the artist’s career to date. Covering all periods of Boetti’s broad oeuvre–including early sculptural experiments associated with the Arte Povera movement, conceptual and ephemeral projects of the 1970s and the monumental embroideries and tapestries he fabricated up to his death–this richly illustrated catalogue is structured as a typology of the artist’s body of work rather than a chronological progression.

  • Allen Jones – Works

    R550

    Paperback, 140 pages

    Published January 3rd 2006 by Royal Academy Books