Showing 17–32 of 347 results

  • Terence Donovan Fashion

    R900

    Terence Donovan was one of the foremost photographers of his generation – among the greatest Britain has ever produced. He came to prominence in London as part of a postwar renaissance in art, fashion, graphic design and photography. Alongside David Bailey and Brian Duffy, photographers of a similar working-class background and outlook, Donovan was a new force in fashion photography. Together, they captured and helped create the Swinging 60s. They socialized with celebrities and royalty, and found themselves elevated to stardom in their own right. Gifted with an unerring eye for the iconic image, Donovan was also master of his craft, a technical genius who pushed the limits of what was possible with a camera. And yet despite his fame and status, there has never been a publication devoted to his fashion work, for he allowed none to be released during his lifetime. Terence Donovan Fashion is thus the first time his fashion pictures have been collected together in book form. Arranged chronologically, from the gritty monochromatic 1960s and 1970s to the vibrant and colourful 1980s and 1990s, the book reveals how his constant invention and experimentation not only set him apart from his contemporaries, but also influenced generations to come. Contributions from some of the many designers, models and art directors who worked with him provide fascinating insights into his practice. Compiled by the artist’s widow Diana Donovan and former art director of Nova magazine and Pentagram partner David Hillman, who worked closely with Donovan for over a decade, and including an illuminating text by Robin Muir, ex-picture editor of Vogue, and foreword by Grace Coddington, creative director of American Vogue and advisor to the project, Terence Donovan Fashion is indisputably a landmark in the history of fashion photography.

  • The Berlin School: Films from the Berliner Schule

    R450

    Beginning around 15 years ago, a loose affiliation of scholars, writers and filmmakers living in Berlin began presenting films that offered a new, aesthetically driven form of political cinema. Abandoning the post-totalitarian context embraced by most commercially popular German films at the time, these films pursued a stylized realism to explore and address a national crisis of identity and purpose.

  • The Dog in Photography 1839–Today

    R360

    Forget #dogsofinstagram, this is real canine art, showing how the camera has been key witness to dogs in all their diversity, character, and friendship, from pensive pooch portraits to four-pawed action shots.

  • The Edge of Vision : The Rise of Abstraction in Photography

    R450

    From the beginning, abstraction has been intrinsic to photography, and its persistent popularity reveals much about the medium. Now available in an affordable paperback edition, The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography is the first book in English to document this phenomenon and to put it into historical context, while also examining the diverse approaches thriving within contemporary photography. Author Lyle Rexer examines abstraction at pivotal moments, starting with the inception of photography, when many of the pioneers believed the camera might reveal other aspects of reality. The Edge of Vision traces subsequent explorations–from the Photo-Secessionists, who emphasized process and emotional expression over observed reality, to Modernist and Surrealist experiments.

  • The Golden Age of DC Comics

    R360

    The single most comprehensive book on the subject, this volume traces the company’s first decades, from its pulp origins up to the comic book burnings of the McCarthy ’50s in more than 400 pages bursting with comics, art, comics, photographs, and more comics. Also included is an exclusive interview with legendary artist Joe Kubert.

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    The Star Wars Archives

    R360

    In this first volume, made with the full cooperation of Lucasfilm, Lucas narrates his own story, taking us through the making of the original trilogy?Episode IV: A New Hope, Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, and Episode VI: Return of the Jedi?and bringing fresh insights into the creation of a unique universe.

  • The Walt Disney Film Archives

    R450

    With extensive research conducted through the historical collections of the Walt Disney Company, as well as private collections, editor Daniel Kothenschulte curates some of the most precious concept paintings and storyboards to reveal just how these animation masterpieces came to life.

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    Ubu and the Turth Commision by Jane Taylor

    R1500

    This play is a collaboration between writer Jane Taylor, artist William Kentridge, and Basil Jones and Adrian Kohler of the Handspring Puppet Company (who brought War Horse to England’s National Theatre). The main protagonist is based on the scandalous character, Ubu, created by the surrealist poet, Alfred Jarry.

  • Warhol : A Life as Art

    R380

    Warhol sought out all the most glamorous figures of his times – Susan Sontag, Mick Jagger, the Barons de Rothschild – despite being burdened with an almost crippling shyness. Behind the public glitter of the artist’s Factory, with its superstars, drag queens and socialites, there was a man who lived with his mother for much of his life and guarded the privacy of his home. He overcame the vicious homophobia of his youth to become a symbol of gay achievement, while always seeking the pleasures of traditional romance and coupledom.

  • Wayne Barker – Artist’s monographs

    R150

    Wayne Barker’s artistic career spans almost two decades, marked by a bitter-sweet mix of politics, poetry, and a passion for subversion. Tracking that career from apartheid South Africa’s most violent years to a new democratic dispensation, the artist’s monograph explores the contradictory impulses of “African identity”.

  • World Press Photo 2008

    R250

    The World Press Photo Competition 2008 brings together some 200 images. The best pictorial journalism from an eventful year, this selection brings us face to face with contemporary world events—an impressive visual record of social, political, cultural, scientific, and, above all, human milestones. 200 illustrations, 150 in color.

  • A Fourfold Vision

    R600

    The profound and lyric photographs of Ralph Eugene Meatyard open us up to at least a double world, a world where all that is invisible, or only felt, or only dreamed, is as true, or as possible, or as necessary, as the ground which holds us down…In this book, these particular images are at least double exposures, and it would be tempting to stop there, in the twofold world of double vision

  • Mexico: A Photographic History

    R520

    Thirty years after the founding of Mexico’s Fototeca Nacional, this big, bold first catalogue of the archive’s holdings offers a panoramic history of the art of photography in Mexico–a look into one of the most important image collections in Latin America and testimony to over 130 years of social, political, cultural, artistic, scientific and economic happenings.

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    Zanele Muholi Exhibition Book

    R500

    Created to accompany one of the most exciting exhibitions of 2020, this stunning paperback catalogue presents the full breadth of Muholi’s photographic and activist practice.

    Richly illustrated, it includes images from the key series Muholi has produced over the past twenty years, as well as never-before-published and recent works. The exhibition book also features six newly commissioned essays exploring their work, as well as a full glossary and chronology.

  • Out of stock

    A City Refracted

    Johannesburg’s inner city has, since the mining town’s formation, served as the first stop for new arrivals. As such it has always been vibrant and in a constant state of flux. I initially started photographing the area in the nineties when racial segregation laws were being lifted and black South Africans had begun moving from…

  • A History of Photography. From 1839 to the Present

    R330

    George Eastman’s career developed in a particularly American way. The founder of Kodak progressed from a delivery boy to one of the most important industrialists in American history, and a crucial innovator in photographic history. Eastman died in 1932, and left his house to the University of Rochester.